September 2016 Projects

HOME   WORKSHOP

August 2016 Projects    All Projects

 

(Click on thumbnails to view larger images)

PRESENTER

WWCH’s own Fred Sandoval talked to club members about how he constructed his own Roubo work bench (the bench is named after the French woodworker, Andre Roubo, who developed a style of workbench in the late 1700s). Fred’s workbench must weigh a ton and this one is the “baby” one – he has a bigger one at his home shop.   READ MORE


SHOW and TELL PROJECTS

A cutting board make of end grain wood with maple sides was shown by Lynn Cummings.  He finished it with mineral oil.

The Barnegat Bay Light House in New Jersey is featured on Steve Wavro’s recent intarsia artwork for the parents of his Brother-in-Law who live near the lighthouse.  Working from a photograph Steve designed his own pattern and added a few nice touches such as Jersey Mike’s Subs being advertised from a low flying airplane (he also likes those subs).  Steve used brads to create the light house top fencing.  The piece was finished in polycrylic because it doesn’t yellow.

Daddy’s Hands is what Rick Spacek called his latest scroll saw art.  Rick used black and blue paper for backing and thinned acrylic blue paint for the blue jeans.  He finished with spray-on clear polycrylic.

 

Denis Muras did not sing “Hound Dog” nor talk about the gorilla his dreams but he did craft and demonstrate a couple of pull toys using walnut for the hardness and maple for the action parts.  Denis used polyurethane that was polished with a microfiber cloth.  The pattern is a David Wakefield from his book.

Lon Kelley used lacewood to craft these jewelry boxes for his grandniece twins.  The top is padauk.  Lon talked about how he crafted the lettering and the tops for a nice fit. Lon elicited discussion of leopardwood and lacewood, two similar looking woods from South America.

Tom Blanco's dresser is of solid cherry top and drawer fronts.  The side panels are cherry veneer. The challenge Tom found was matching the finish color to existing furniture. Joinery is dovetail plus mortise and tenon.

A table with a top of white oak and legs of cherry was crafted by Tom Blanco.  Tom explained that the top started out at ¾ inches but wound up thinner.  Tom finished the legs with gel stain and lacquer.  He used lacquer to fill the small voids around the knots.  The coloring of the legs was designed to contrast with the lighter top. Tom credited Lynn Cummings for the design.

Definitely not cheesy work but intended as tools for cheese and a gift for in-laws in where else but Wisconsin, the Cheese State.  John Gay used walnut dowels to craft the handles for the cheese tools from Rockler.

David Janowitz showed club members an assortment of items crafted from Osage Orange that came from trees in Old Waverly, TX. Walnut provided the darking contrasting wood. David used mineral oil to finish the cutting boards.

Once again, Bob Wink showed club members his whimsical craftwork depicting Bob’s alter ego relatives, the “Woods”.   Bob used an ammo box from WW2 and drawers from a 1950 chest of drawers for the frame work. 

Two works in progress is what Glen Edwards called his Dove and The Lord’s Prayer.  The base for the Lord’s Prayer is western cedar with poplar lettering.  The Dove is half-inch walnut.  Both patterns came from old Scroll Saw issues from seven or eight years back.

 

WWCH’s own Fred Sandoval talked to club members about how he constructed his own Roubo work bench (the bench is named after the French woodworker, Andre Roubo, who developed a style of workbench in the late 1700s). Fred’s workbench must weigh a ton and this one is the “baby” one – he has a bigger one at his home shop.    

Fred started out by hand selecting warp and twist free 2x6s at the local big box home improvement store then jointing and planning them for consistency.  Using Titebond glue Fred explained his technique for gluing the planks pieces at a time to create the bench top.  Fred hand-made wooden screws for the vises, Tail, Shoulder, Wagon, and Leg.  To avoid marring work pieces Fred glued pads of leather to the vise faces with Gorilla glue.

Fred explained his techniques for constructing and assemblying the legs to the table top, the wooden vise screws and why he prefers them over metal ones.

Fred leveled off the top with a big jointer plane followed by a sanding block. For finishing Fred used two coats of linseed oil that was set aside for a week.  Then another coat and a week to dry.  Fred did not want a smooth finish but preferred a rough texture.  The rest of the bench is polyurethane.

       

************************************************************************************************************

Photos and commentary:  Gary Rowen            

 

 

 

 

Back to Top of Page

HOME   WORKSHOP