March 2016 Projects

HOME   WORKSHOP

February 2016 Projects    All Projects   April 2016 Projects

 

(Click on thumbnails to view larger images)

 

PRESENTER

For the March meeting program, John Gay presented information about shop safety. During the meeting, he showed a chart that provided information about wood toxicity for specific woods. Here is a link to some very detailed information about wood toxicity. It includes two charts, each with detailed information about specific woods: Wood Toxicity Information and Specific Toxic Woods Charts. **  John noted that, “bad habits are accidents waiting to happen,” and listed the following bad habits that are important to eliminate.  READ MORE


SHOW and TELL PROJECTS

  

The blanket chest of Osage orange comes with an aromatic cedar bottom – a birthday project for David Janowitz's wife.

.

 

Confessing that he bought wood, John Gay acquired bamboo from Ebay.    John resawed walnut flooring and glued it to plywood to create the veneer used in the panels of this sink/vanity. 

 

 

Is someone missing some roller skate wheels?  Denis Muras used those wheels as part of his strip sander made of scrap wood.  The design came from “Woodgears.ca” out of Canada.  It is halfway finished and Denis will see how it works when a motor is attached. 

 

   

For background music Rick Spacek crafted a music box of oak shaped as a grand piano and finished with black lacquer.  The white keys are of Corian. 

 

 

David Janowitz came prepared with Osage orange bottle stoppers - I wonder if they'll work on soda cans?

 

Calling it Henny Penny, Norm Nichols used wobble wheels to craft this pull toy. Norm advised not to use parachute chord – use cotton cord instead (no, Norm isn't "stringing" us along). Norm finished with three coats of brushed on polyurethane.

.

 

David Garcia made a plaque of basswood for display at the VFW Hall.  Both sides are laser engraved; one side depicting the US Marine Corps memorial and the other side, the American Flag.

   

Someone’s knees will grace these kneelers of red oak that Henry Majoue, Jr. crafted for the Holy Name Retreat Center. Henry used walnut stain Danish oil.

.

Riding in style is Bill Byrne with a ’37 Ford woody wagon of red oak and African mahogany and a ’21 Ford Model T of walnut and red oak. Bill bought the wheels but everything else scroll sawed from scraps (technically there is no such thing as “scrap” wood to woodworkers”.

 

  

David Janowitz’s wife teaches Pilates and needed somewhere to stash her Pilate rings so David crafted this rack of Baltic birch. 

 

From a Judy Gale Roberts pattern Steve Wavro crafted this intarsia Portland, Maine lighthouse.  Steve studies a pattern before committing himself to using it. In this case Steve felt it had too much white in it so Steve improvised and put in a sun, a couple of birds and sailboats borrowed from another pattern.

 

 

Larry Cormier crafted these bottle stoppers with different woods and different shapes.  Larry used a spin polish from Woodcraft.

 

  

Stepping up to the task, Chuck Graham made this combination stool/step stool of pine.  The design came from an old woodworking magazine. The top is hinged allowing him to change between stool and step stool. It will be for his garage so he didn’t finish it.

 

 

Rick Spacek scroll sawed these wolves from a John Hillson design of spalted pecan he obtained from the country.  Now Rick has something to howl about.  .

 

This poplar puzzle of two dozen pieces was scroll sawed by Chuck Meeder and then finished with shellac with liquid clear wax on top.  Obviously Chuck solved the puzzle – it is all together.

This faith sign makes a fine gift for Joseph Rice’s wife.  The letters came from old cedar fence boards.

.

************************************************************************************************************

For the March meeting program, John Gay presented information about shop safety. During the meeting, he showed a chart that provided information about wood toxicity for specific woods. Here is a link to some very detailed information about wood toxicity. It includes two charts, each with detailed information about specific woods: Wood Toxicity Information and Specific Toxic Woods Charts. **
John noted that, “bad habits are accidents waiting to happen,” and listed the following bad habits that are important to eliminate.
First, don’t use your teeth to open things in the shop, as this can cause toxic material to enter your system.
Second, don’t just lump all of your items together on a table top. Instead, group things according to their uses. The specific example John gave on this was grouping your coffee cup in with your paint or stain cups which could lead to accidental ingestion of finishing chemicals.
Third, use a covered cup and protect your drink from dust, which is not a good way to get fiber in your diet!
Fourth, eliminate clutter in your shop.

John provided lots of good safety tips and practices to follow. During his presentation, he showed some slides with humorous quotes about the “real” uses of equipment. While these quotes are funny, they also make you think about the potential consequences of using equipment and what not to do. Here is a sampling of John’s quotes:
Table Saw: A large stationary power tool commonly used to launch wood projectiles for testing wall integrity.
Drill Press: A tall upright machine useful for suddenly snatching flat stock out of your hands so that it smacks you in the chest and flings your coffee across the room, denting the freshlypainted project which you had carefully set in the corner where nothing could get to it.
Wire Wheel: Cleans paint off bolts and then throws them somewhere under the workbench with the speed of light. Also removes fingerprints and hard earned calluses from fingers in about the time it takes you to say, 'Oh sh --‘.

**Writer's note: I would like to cite the creator of the wood toxicity article but am unable to do so as the information shown on the linked website above appears in different variations on multiple sites.

Photos, captions and commentary:  Gary Rowen   Write up on Presenter:  Lisa Sessions          

 

 

 

 

Back to Top of Page

HOME   WORKSHOP