Woodworkers Club of Houston

February 2016 Projects

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PRESENTERS

 

The February program was over shop design and layout. Mike Turner, right, and Bill Harris, left, wanted to give our membership some ideas and processes that you can implement into your shop. Mike visited and took pictures of four member’s shops in the Houston – Sugar Land area. All of the shops were basically garages that were transformed partially and in some cases totally into woodshops. Here are some ideas to consider in laying out or reorganizing your current shop.  READ MORE


SHOW and TELL PROJECTS


   Andy Anderson showed club members a cutting board and a heart with a hole in it.  The idea is to place the heart near the sink and then place rings and jewelry in it while doing dishes. Andy made a heart felt gift, for sure.

 

   Some fine looking pepper mills were crafted by Chuck Lickwar.    The box is turned from bocote wood, a hard exotic wood from Mexico and Central/South America.

A purple heart shaped box of purple heart wood was crafted by Dean Grimes for his wife.  As did Andy, Dean made a heart felt gift.

 

 

  Brandon Rathke custom placed the rungs on his stool such that his girlfriend’s lap will be horizontal to the floor which will allow her to rest a laptop on her lap while she visits with him in his shop – lucky guy. Brandon used spalted pecan acquired from a scrap bin in a saw mill near Hempstead.  The legs are mahogany and the rungs are poplar.  Finish is natural.  

Denis Muras explained how he scroll sawed these baskets from one piece of wood and how he stacked them to get the effect that you are looking at.  Position it another way and you have an expandable and collapsible basket. Obviously not made for soup.  The rings are attached with Elmer’s glue.  Seeing as how some of us had no clue, Denis went on to explain the intricacies of making jig saw puzzles.

 

This car and trailer was crafted by Will Henderson of ¾ inch MDF and oak for his father, who turned 88, and who is an Auburn University fan.  Grrr…go Tigers!

 

  Tony Blanco demonstrated how the drawers to his drill bit cabinet of plywood will not slide out unless you use a certain procedure.  Great for portability and avoids the proverbial mess when drawers fall out.

 

This exquisite blanket chest of mahogany and curly mango from Hawaii was crafted by Matt Proctor.  Matt finished it with polyurethane.  This time Matt forgot to bring Mai Tais.

Steve Wavro crafted this marvelous intarsia mallard duck of various woods for a friend’s fund raiser auction.  There were hunters in the group so Steve thought the mallard duck would fit the bill.  No, his friend isn’t a doctor.

David Garcia held up some laser engraved plaques that he crafted of solid oak.  A hidden magnet catches bottle caps, of course after the bottle has been opened.  David finished with two coats of oak stain, no poly, just stain.

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Charles Volek explained how he inserted frogs in the bottom of these frog boxes.  Now, will Charles put real croakers in them?

 

Bruce Wright crafted this end table of white oak with ebony trim from plans from an issue of Fine Woodworking.  The style was designed by architect Joseph Hoffman which was inspired by the Japanese influence on style that became popular around 1900.

     

 The master of Osage orange, the Orange man himself, David Janowitz, crafted some bowls and bottle stoppers of … you guessed it… Osage orange.  For a client David constructed two pedestal legs of thick Osage orange to support a table top of monkey pod that weighs 350 pounds. The joints are half rabbit and half miter with some extra screws for additional support.  It should be strong enough to support King Kong.

 

Chuck Meeder’s wife acquired some butternut wood so Chuck turned it into a stand for candle holders.  Butternut is soft and dents real easy.  This will be a centerpiece for the dining room table.  Chuck scroll sawed the flowers that graces the top of these boxes.  The pattern came from a scroll saw magazine holiday 2015 issue. Flower stamens came from Michael’s.  Chuck finished with shellac topped with three coats of lacquer.

    

Many an elbow will soon bend on the 300 pound bar top of 125 year old sinker-cypress wood constructed by Lynn Cummings for a restaurant owner client.  Lynn was able to use heavy-duty large woodworking tools at Houston Hardwoods to machine the slab out to 16 feet by 26 inches by 2 ½ inches.  Sinker-cypress is wood that has long been immersed in swamp water. 

 

    
  

 

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Shop Design and Layout

The February program was over shop design and layout. Mike Turner and Bill Harris wanted to give our membership some ideas and processes that you can implement into your shop. Mike visited and took pictures of four member’s shops in the Houston – Sugar Land area. All of the shops were basically garages that were transformed partially and in some cases totally into woodshops. Here are some ideas to consider in laying out or reorganizing your current shop.

1.  Inventory your equipment- identify stationary and mobile tools. Tools such as table saws, jointers and planers generally require and take up a certain amount of space, whereas other tools such as a drill press, band saw, disc-belt sander require less space. Depending on your shop space and the amount of tools you own will dictate the placement of each tool.

 

2.  The storage area for your materials also affects your production process and equipment placement. Here are the basic steps in producing straight, square stock.

A) Cut stock to rough length. (cut-off saw)

B) Square one face. (jointer)

C) Square the adjacent edge.(jointer)

D) Plane to thickness.(Thickness Planer)

E) Rip to finish width. (Table saw)

F) Square one end. (Compound miter saw or Table saw)

G) Cut to finish length.(Compound miter saw or Table saw). Depending on your space, you may be able to align your tools with this process.

3.  Measure the area to be used for your shop. Locate doors, windows, etc. Do a scaled floorplan of your shop area on grid paper or on your computer using a CAD program. You can then measure the length and width of the equipment to be used and make scaled cutouts of each piece of equipment. This is easier on CAD if you have access to a computer. Once you have the cutouts you can begin to redesign your shop area without physically rearranging your shop. You can then also check to see what kind of clearances you have between your equipment.

4. Things to consider: island bench or wall bench, type of woodworking you are going to do, A/C / heating, dust collection system, sufficient electrical connections and finishing/flammable storage area.

5.  You can also go online on the internet and view tons of information on shop layout.

 

Thanks to the following members for allowing me to come and photograph your shops:

Fred Sandoval, Sid Hockens, John Gay, and Bill Harris.

 

Written by Mike Turner and Bill Harris

 

 

Photos, captions and commentary:  Gary Rowen             

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