June 2015 Projects

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PRESENTER

  Steve Procter, former President of WWCH, spoke to members about how he put together his ambitious project to install a home theater in his home --- in his attic of all places.  To enter this portal into Hollywood a visitor must pass through a secret door that is hidden behind a book case.  Steve explained how he had to beef up the book case so it would swing without scraping or sagging on the floor – strong hinges of Kryptonite.  Once past this door you come to a ticket booth but it’s okay, no one’s in there to sell you one.  Check out what’s playing or coming soon – there’s a billboard to read.  Enter through another set of doors and you enter the theater complete with concession stand, comfy seats, air conditioning and even personal facilities.

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SHOW and TELL PROJECTS


         

Andy Anderson presented a game board for Aggravation.  David Graham has recently purchased a CNC Router, and he made this game board for Andy.  David designed the game board, and this board can accommodate six players.  Andy noted that David has agreed to make some templates for four player games if he is supplied some masonite board.  Andy asked the group if they would be interested in making some game boards out of Wink wood for the toy group if the templates were provided.  The group was enthusiastic about this project and agreed to make some game boards for the toy group.

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 Norm Nichols presented a scroll saw piece he created from a Steve Good pattern.  It is made of black walnut and finished with spray polyurethane.  Norm noted that the piece was fairly easy to make.  If you are just getting started in scroll sawing, Norm recommends Steve Good’s patterns as a great starting place.  You can find Steve’s patterns at:  www.scrollsawworkshop.blogspot.com.

      

Rick Spacek lost a big oak tree at his place, and this is one of the pieces he has made from it.  This project is from a modified Sue Mey pattern.  The wood was so hard, he thought he would have use chain saw!  The piece is finished with a clear, natural stain.  Rick noted that he did not cut it with a spiral saw blade because the wood was too hard.  Instead he used a larger blade of unknown size. 

     

Steve Wavro presented a summer inspired intarsia beach chair and umbrella scene.  He used an old weathered fence picket for the pole so it would look like an old umbrella pole.  The shadow under the chair is cut from the same piece of wood but dyed to obtain the color difference.  There are about 89 pieces in this project.  This is a Judy Gale Roberts design which Steve modified to fit his preferences.  The piece is finished with water-based poly acrylic clear finish.

          

Lon Kelley Lon showed us two boxes.  One will be a wedding gift, and one will be an anniversary gift.  The boxes are made of sapele and maple woods and finished with spray polyurethane.

   
 

John Gay

John Gay constructed a book house for his friend in the Heights.  Book houses are used for swapping books.  Anyone can take a book as long as he or she leaves a book.  This book house is made out of reclaimed cedar fence boards.  The wood has been outside for 40 years already, but John did finish the house by painting it with 2 part resin epoxy glue.  This will protect the house from the elements.

John provided a couple of tips about using epoxy glue as a finish.  First, don’t make a big batch!  The glue goes on thin like thin paint, but then it starts getting warm and smoking.  To finish the book house, John made 3 smaller batches.  John likes to apply epoxy glue on end grains before finishing a piece, as it keeps the end grain from soaking up a lot of finish and being a lot darker than the edge and face grains. 

 

    
 

 

Bob Wink noted that he hasn’t done any tramp art for a while, so he decided to focus on that this past month.  The three items he showed include a religious piece with candle holders, a display box with a mirror, and a tramp art Alamo.  He noted that Chuck has agreed to carve a Davey Crocket and Jim Bowie to go with the Alamo piece!

 
   

Chuck Meeder showed the group a carved spoon he made out of cherry wood.  The handle is shaped like a calla lily.  Chuck finished the spoon with Watco Danish oil and a couple of coats of Briwax.


Henry Majoue  About 2 ½ years ago, Henry was travelling in Vermont.  He stopped at a roadside place., and saw this rocker.  He liked it and took a picture, and now he has finally finished it.  The rocker is made out of clear pine, and many of the joints are put together with loose tenons and glued.  The rocker is stitched together with 5/16” poly rope.  Henry chose poly rope because it stretches less.  He tried to dye the rope, but it came out green instead of tan colored.  The rocker is finished with a stain conditioner and four coats of Danish oil in a fruitwood finish.  The final coat has 25% polyurethane mixed in.

Patrick Davis showed end tables that he made out of birch wood and likely Phillipine mahogany.  The smaller end table has a top that lifts, and the larger end table has a drawer with through dovetails on the front.

Charles Volek presented an intarsia light house project.  He noted that he almost likes the island more than the light house because of all of the different woods in it.  The project is from a pattern in an old scroll saw magazine.  Charles altered the pattern quite a bit and simplified the light house portion.  The only stain he used is the white varnish on the light house.  Everything else is natural and finished with polyurethane.

Chris Farquhar showed a scroll saw train art piece that he made for his dad out of pine and black walnut.  The pattern is from a booklet advertised in Scroller Magazine that includes planes, trains, and automobiles.  He noted that he had taken the pattern and shrunk it, and the smaller pattern made the work much harder to do since all of the spots got smaller as well.  Chris also made the frame for the piece. 

David Garcia showed two pieces to the group.  The first project is a picture frame that is designed to hold either a picture or a tablet computer.  The second piece is for holding mail, and the front includes a scroll saw pattern on it.  The design is from Dave Ramsey.  Both are made from scrap pallet wood.  The frame is finished with tung oil.   

Larry Wenner  showed two boxes he made from crown molding.  He noted that if you turn one over, they both have the same profile.  The final project Larry presented was an unfinished microwave table made out of Wink wood.  When finished, the table will have two drawers and a door on the bottom and will be painted white.

Singa Katari is planning to retire in about 3 years, so he was looking for a new activity and purchased a scroll saw.  At first, the pieces he was trying to cut on the saw seemed to fly away, and they were not feeding into pattern.  After some time and practice, he was able to cut out the pattern and create this intarsia rose.  
  David Janowitz used Osage orange wood to make this breakfast tray.  He purchased the stainless steel handles from the clearance shelf at Home Depot and finished the tray with water based polyurethane.  David also showed some turned handles for wood turning tools that he made from Osage orange.  A friend at TX/RX Labs made the metal shaft that goes almost all the way to the base.  The metal shafts are square, so David had to route out the channels for the shafts. 
         Larry Wenner built a chest on chest out of mahogany with solid tiger maple drawer fronts.  The unit stands nearly six feet tall and is about 38 inches wide.  The finish is gloss polyurethane.  The project was a wedding gift for his grandniece.  
Larry Wenner

Steve Procter, former President of WWCH, spoke to members about how he put together his ambitious project to install a home theater in his home --- in his attic of all places.  To enter this portal into Hollywood a visitor must pass through a secret door that is hidden behind a book case.  Steve explained how he had to beef up the book case so it would swing without scraping or sagging on the floor – strong hinges of Kryptonite.  Once past this door you come to a ticket booth but it’s okay, no one’s in there to sell you one.  Check out what’s playing or coming soon – there’s a billboard to read.  Enter through another set of doors and you enter the theater complete with concession stand, comfy seats, air conditioning and even personal facilities.

The silver screen sits above a real stage big enough to host a stage play put on by children of any and all ages – yeah --- grampas and grammas too.

Steve described how he constructed the overhead dome topped by what Steve calls an oculus – an eye to the “heavens” but relax, you won’t be “under the dome” in his theater.  Steve pointed out the many embellishments he used to create a traditional theater feel rather than a visit to your local multiplex cinema.

Steve’s presented a slide show entitled, “Managing Large Cabinet Projects”.  He explained how to start out with project sketches and drawings. A cut list is very helpful also. Steve showed several examples of large cabinet type projects that he has completed along with the drawings he prepared for them.

Steve’s secret materials consisted mostly of MDF and plywood but with hardwoods strategically placed for some of the embellishments.

Project Photos and Procter write up:  Gary Rowen    Captions: Lisa Sessions                    

 

 

 

 

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