August 2015 Projects

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WWCH’s own Mark Bolinger spoke to club members and guests about sharpening at the August 2015 meeting.  Although his talk addressed mostly hand planes the principles apply to similar instruments such as chisels. Using a folded magazine insert reply card, Mark pointed out that the objective of sharpening is get two planes (in the geometry sense) to meet in a perfect straight line. READ MORE


SHOW and TELL PROJECTS


       

  

Proudly stating that he will be a Grandpa for the first time, Fred Sandoval made a cradle of red oak in the French heritage style.  Fred commented that turning dry red oak on a lathe is not easy.  He also explained how he used wedged tenons for joinery.  Fred finished with five coats of Hydra-Coat, a rub on finish.  Fred made templates for this cradle and members are welcome to borrow them from him.

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Rick Spacek crafted these survival knives then assembled a box with Plexiglas for display.

     

 

The segmented star on Hugh Parker’s box was his first attempt – good job, Hugh.  The star was cut by handsaw but wouldn’t come together.  He found out that his miter jig was not exactly at 36 degrees.  He fixed that then it worked. Hugh finished with water borne polyurethane.

 

   

 

Setting the bevel and miter of these segmented bowls of mahogany and walnut proved a bit tricky for Lon Kelley but after some trial and error he got it right.  For the maple stars he cut strips then used the bandsaw to cut the points.   Lon also explained his problems with the epoxy – because of the humidity it would boil – you can see tiny little bubbles (that aren’t in his wine).

 

           

 

Very old growth southern yellow taken from the walls, floors and ceilings of a country house provides the source wood for Denis Muras’s table for his nieces.  He finished the table with five coats of wipe on polyurethane.  Denis will be offering some yellow pine for sale to club members.

 

        

Rick Spacek took a piece of oak to see if he could put a cross in it.  And he did.  Rick didn’t smooth it up, he wanted the look of the cross being “in” the wood.

 

 

 

    

    

Hoping to ward off evil spirits, but not the imbibing kind, Chuck Meeder crafted this Polynesian totem pole from 2x construction material, mostly 2x12, 2x8, and other pieces stacked together.  Chuck used outdoor acrylic craft paint with a primer underneath the paint.  He used three to four coats of each color.

  

 

A 13 year old grandson of Bill Byrne asked him to make a jeep.  Of course, Bill figured it wouldn’t be too hard….hah…hah… Bill stated that most plans are a few pages but this jeep was nine pages – fun but a lot of effort (metaphor for lot of work). Bill added the detail of the brake and accelerator.  The jeep is mostly oak with some mahogany.  Bill also said it took 10% of his time to cut, 10% to re-cut and 50% sanding and fitting.  Bill knows his grandson will take care of it, it’s the littler grandsons that might give that jeep a workout.

 

   

Glen Edwards (who comes to our meetings from Austin, TX) showed club members his deftly crafted nativity scene.  ¼ inch walnut pieces all fit into the box.  He will be making more for sale at a special event in Houston in October.  The butterfly cross is crafted of regal plastic, a request from his wife.

 

David Janowitz explained how he constructed his sled jointer/planer using the torsion box system.  This jig allows David to joint one side of a board in a planer, a board too wide for a jointer.  The first pass flattens one side then, after flipping the stock over, he planes the other side.

 

Fred Sandoval showed club members a marking gauge and and a compass for drawing large arcs.

 

 
 
      
 
  
  

WWCH’s own Mark Bolinger spoke to club members and guests about sharpening at the August 2015 meeting.  Although his talk addressed mostly hand planes the principles apply to similar instruments such as chisels. Using a folded magazine insert reply card, Mark pointed out that the objective of sharpening is get two planes (in the geometry sense) to meet in a perfect straight line.

Mark reminded everyone that you don’t have to dread sharpening, but you do have to sharpen frequently to keep them sharp because sharpening is 75 % of success with using hand planes.

Mark addressed two strategies for sharpening:  hollow ground or secondary (micro) bevel. Hollow grinding leaves you with only a little bit of metal to remove for the final bevel. 

Hollow grinding requires the use of a grinding wheel – the curvature of the wheel will create the hollow space.  However with this technique you must not overheat the blade lest you lose temper – the blade, that is, and maybe yours too.  The advantage of the hollow grind method is that you can do the honing by hand, since the bevel will now register on the stones with no variation in angle; it solidly rests on the two ends of the arc created by the hollow grind. 

To determine the angle of the edge you need to know if your hand plane is bevel down or bevel up.  If one is unsure, it should be easy to determine with a quick internet search for the model of the plane.  The following reference is an excellent discussion of the angles involved http://www.amgron.clara.net/page73.html.  

For bevel up plane blades Mark recommends the micro bevel method because putting in the hollow grind affects the angle required.

To begin sharpening you need to flatten the back first.  Mark states that there is no way around this.

After the grinding is complete you begin the honing. With stone grits Mark starts out with grits of 800, then successively 1200, 6000, then finishing up with 12000.  It's ok to stop at 6000 or 8000 grit, Mark only recently acquired the 12000 grit stone.

Stropping is the final step.  Mark points out that the literature has many ways to do it and it is hard to find a good explanation as to what stropping is and why it works.  The best explanation that Mark found is that the strop is a little bit flexible whereas everything else is rigid.  This flexibility cleans off imperfections.

To re-sharpen an edge with a microbevel, or to return to the original angle, you will need to use a guide.  Mark showed some examples of clamp on top and clamp on the side jigs. Mark stressed that you needn’t worry about being in the exact position you were before because you can’t go back and repeat perfectly that secondary bevel.  In effect, you need to recreate the secondary bevel.  It's easy to do unless you over sharpen and make it too big.  The advantage of the hollow grind is the blade will still register against the stone with the same angle, so it's easier to do a light touch-up of the edge.

Whatever medium you are using you’ll need to periodically flatten them unless you are using sandpaper which you just replace.

Mark stated that a cheap plane blade with weak metallurgy will work just as well as an expensive plane, the only difference being that with the cheaper variety you’ll have to sharpen more often.

One test of final sharpness is to shave end grain.  If you can get a nice shaving you’ve done a good job.

       

 

Project Photos:  Gary Rowen    Captions:                    

 

 

 

 

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