May 2013 Projects

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PRESENTER
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 Dan Tremble, president of Clouse Floors, spoke about the science of wood flooring.  There is definitely more than just laying down wood to make a floor.  For example, engineered wood flooring used to be cheap, prefinished, and thin-veneered; it is now available in much higher grades with thick top layers of sliced hardwood.

Dan generally prefers solid, pure botanical species for aesthetics and durability.  However, there are applications where the highest grade engineered plank is superior to its solid wood counterpart, e.g. extra wide and extra long planks to be installed over an on-grade slab. 

Dan advised that hand-scraped wood flooring comes in two very different forms:  prefinished veneer and job site finished solid wood.  The cost difference is extreme, so if building your dream home, nothing is as fine as solid wood wide plank with custom pillowed edges.  For a home where $20+/ft² flooring is not economical, there are prefinished, distressed, or “hand-scraped look” floors priced closer to $10/ft² that can be completed in 1/3 of the time.  The drawback is they cannot be refinished.  Another way to get flooring with character is to use lower grades where the wood naturally has knots and blemishes, saving money and still being a real wood floor with character.  With engineered flooring, whether prefinished or job finished, Dan cautioned us to note the top layer’s thickness.  Beware of cheap, thin veneered flooring as the ability to fix dings and scratches is very limited. 

Dan described the difference between plain-sawn wood and quarter-sawn wood and how that difference appears when cut into flooring.  Dan reminded us that "laminate" flooring is a photograph of wood on base material and not even wood veneer.  He jokes that using it goes against the spirit of the WWCH, but confesses:  “Some of it looks pretty decent and is economical. 

Dan invites club members to Google "Clouse Floors Houston" or go to www.clousefloors.com for a direct link to his email.  He encourages follow up questions, and if we'd like, welcomes a return visit to share thoughts on other wood floor-related topics. 

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SHOW and TELL PROJECTS
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John Gay acquired this bed head board that was manufactured around 1900 then took it to a car wash to power wash it clean.  After that he refinished it and added bench seats to it - no it isn't intended to be a short bed.  It is all white oak.  John added weights in the back for stability.  This finished product will grace a new cafe called the  Tea Room.  

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    Who gives a hoot about owls?  Well, Rick Spacek certainly does as you can see in these two finely scrollsawed and framed works of art. 

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 Charles Volek shows his valet box of pecan finished with wipe on polyurethane.

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       L1040125.JPG (276647 bytes) L1040154.JPG (116876 bytes)  Tom Matherly knows what time the bar is open because it is always after five someone in the world.  What is unique about this clock is that he used a CNC machine.
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  Linzie Rogers holds boxes that he made of pean, maple, ebony and shedua from Ghana. The top of one box is opened by pushing down on one side of the lid - the other side lifts up which allows you to grab it and remove the top - slick, isn't it?              L1040133.JPG (238557 bytes) L1040134.JPG (287612 bytes) L1040136.JPG (262727 bytes) L1040137.JPG (341406 bytes) L1040139.JPG (232904 bytes) L1040156.JPG (82840 bytes) L1040159.JPG (78225 bytes) L1040160.JPG (88210 bytes)
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      Jo.
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