February 2008 Projects 

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January 2008 Projects  March 2008 Projects

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Steve LeGrue, owner of The Cutting Edge, talked to Club members about joinery.  

Some tips:

Don't bother gluing end grain

Golden Rule:  You need good surface to surface connection.

A tenon should be about one-third width of the stock.

A mortise and tenon joint should be tight but not too tight.

Make dovetails proud and use a shoulder plain to trim them.

Before belt sanding let joints glued with biscuits dry overnight to avoid dimples that temporarily form due to expansion of the biscuits.

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SHOW and TELL PROJECTS
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  David VanDerwerker describes how he crafted these heart shaped boxes of oak and mahogany --  and just in time for Valentine's Day. The band sawed boxes were made from a plan in the Jan/Feb 1992 of Woodworkers Journal.

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David wows Club members with a little "magic" to show how his lawn chair easily disassembles for portability. The chair and table were made from a plan in the book "Woodworking for the Backyard"

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 Denis Muras elatedly shows off his pull toy of walnut and maple finished with wipe-on polyurethane.

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 I don't see any puppies but this item, well crafted by Steve Singleton, is a Hush Pup.  A quilter uses this to store pieces for quilting material. 
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Bill Cole explains that this keep sake box has been in his family for many years.  The crafter is not known. Bill says his entry is really a "Show and Ask".       DSC00245.jpg (230540 bytes) DSC00246.jpg (179619 bytes)  DSC00269.jpg (100801 bytes)
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DSC00257.jpg (229583 bytes)  DSC00258.jpg (212113 bytes)  DSC00270.jpg (73774 bytes) Brian Honey gestures about his "Beveled Beauty", a box made of Bird's Eye Maple and Cherry from a design from Wood Magazine. Brian finished with linseed oil then lacquer followed by steel wool for a rubout finish.
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Do you see the resemblance?  Rich Thomas crafted an image of his son on maple plywood framed with mahogany using his "machine".  Click here to see "machine" DSC00244.jpg (237201 bytes)  DSC00271.jpg (114894 bytes)
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DSC00259.jpg (155757 bytes)  DSC00260.jpg (139794 bytes)  DSC00261.jpg (123761 bytes)   Jeff Levy got ready to rock as he explained how he crafted his electric guitar of maple, mahogany and rosewood. DSC00273.jpg (63951 bytes)
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Mark Bolinger points to one of the panels that comprises one sliding door of a TV stand. Windows are included so he could use slats that were already cut from a previous project.  Mark explained how the bottom is a thin rail and the top is beveled to allow easy extraction. The TV stand is finished with Danish oil and polyurethane. DSC00993.jpg (385840 bytes) DSC00274.jpg (68037 bytes) DSC00997.jpg (264102 bytes)  DSC00996.jpg (564692 bytes)
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IMG_0469.jpg (536078 bytes)    IMG_0470.jpg (826189 bytes) IMG_0467.jpg (519573 bytes) Carolyn and "Doc" Cotton explain how they constructed this bookcase and were quick to point out that you can never have too many clamps.DSC00276.jpg (102899 bytes)
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