March 2005 Projects 

HOME

  February 2005 Projects  April 2005 Projects

(Click on thumbnails to view larger images)

*****************************************************************************
Rudy Lippert explains how he crafted the walnut table and the mahogany pedestal on what he claims is the world's oldest Shopsmith, a machine built in the 1940s.  Rudy explained how he turned the Shopsmith motor around and cemented a tool rest stand in a cinder block.    StandMar05-10.jpg (136569 bytes)  TableRoundMar05-21.jpg (115534 bytes)    TableSmallMar05-11.jpg (204506 bytes) LipperMar05-20.jpg (99408 bytes)
*****************************************************************************

 

*****************************************************************************

CarvingsMar05-07.jpg (171933 bytes) CarvingsMar05-08.jpg (173595 bytes)  CarvingsMar05-09.jpg (163177 bytes)  HowardMar05-22.jpg (85025 bytes)

Jim Howard shows club members his balsa wood menagerie. Mr. Howard is one of the club's founding members.
*****************************************************************************

 

*****************************************************************************

Brian Honey demonstrated how he uses his sandpaper jig to cut sheets of sandpaper to the size desired.        

HoneyMar05-23.jpg (102723 bytes)     

*****************************************************************************

 

*****************************************************************************

 ScrolSawFishMar05-01.jpg (203909 bytes)     ScrollSawFishMar05-02.jpg (291707 bytes)      ScrollSawSawMar05-03.jpg (215572 bytes)  ScrollSawSawMar05-04.jpg (320798 bytes)  

Norm Nichols pointed out the details in these scrollwork items of walnut and aspen.  He will enter these into competition at the woodworker's show in Branson, Missouri.       NicholsMar05-25.jpg (108676 bytes)

*****************************************************************************

 

*****************************************************************************

Dennis Muras holds up a John Deere engine - put-put-put.

EngineMar05-13.jpg (68692 bytes)  MurasMar05-27.jpg (117545 bytes)  EngineMar05-14.jpg (96599 bytes) 

*****************************************************************************

 

*****************************************************************************

HutchisonMar05-28.jpg (121747 bytes)   TableMar05-06.jpg (161871 bytes)  GilmerMar05-32.jpg (133428 bytes) 

Jack Hutchison talks about the 18th century Shaker cherry tables that were made by his students, Ridg Gilmer and Tom Bouquest at his seminar at the Cutting Edge The tops are 7/8 inches thick but are tapered creating a thinner look.

*****************************************************************************

 

*****************************************************************************

Michael Whelton talks about his foldable and collapsible piece that can be a desk, a chair or a table.  Piano hinges hold together the pieces of salvaged oak.

FoldingChairMar05-12.jpg (188323 bytes) FoldingChairMar05-39.jpg (129689 bytes)  WheltonMar05-35.jpg (124073 bytes)

  

*****************************************************************************

 

*****************************************************************************

FootStoolMar05-15.jpg (233237 bytes)  TurnerMar05-37.jpg (106738 bytes)

Mike Turner shows off a footstool that one of his students made in his high school shop class.         

*****************************************************************************

 

*****************************************************************************

       Dennis Serig describes how he made this cat scratch table of strips of cardboard that will be glued together.

CatTableMar05-16.jpg (211160 bytes)  CatTableMar05-17.jpg (141453 bytes)SerigMar05-38.jpg (147106 bytes)

*****************************************************************************

 

*****************************************************************************

Mike Turner gave a captivating talk on shop safety providing numerous war stories and video taped graphics of actual accidents.  Safety starts with the right mindset -- your body follows your mind.  Make safety a habit.  Even with years of experience many veterans make mistakes because of complacency, they let their guard down.  Remorse stays with you for the rest of your life. Don't use the wrong or insufficient protection either.

 

Doing repetitive actions on the table saw?  

Make it a habit to pull your hand AWAY from (not above) the saw blade before pulling back.  

For a router always UNPLUG before changing bits.  

Remember to WEAR those safety glasses. 

TurnerMar05-40.jpg (110935 bytes)    

*****************************************************************************

 

HOME   Back to Top of Page