July 2005 Projects 

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This trash receptacle of pressure treated pine was constructed by Dennis Serig as a prototype for others in his neighborhood.  Six more will soon be on the asembly line .      TrashCanHolderJul05-18.jpg (111808 bytes)  TrashCanHolderJul05-19.jpg (205557 bytes)SerigJul05-09.jpg (119761 bytes)
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 GilmerJul05-11.jpg (99413 bytes) ChaiseLoungeJul05-06.jpg (191387 bytes)

Ridg Gilmer demonstrates how to relax on his chaise lounge of cypress.  Ridg used a router to smooth the edges then finished with Thompson's Water Seal....mint julep anyone???
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Rich Thomas talks about his Stickley style plant stand that he crafted mostly from one quartersawn white oak board.  The pegs are of walnut and the joinery is mortise and tenon. For a finish Rich used General Finish and Stain from Rockler topped off with several coats of polyurethane

  StickleyStandJul05-08.jpg (189722 bytes) ThomasJul05-12.jpg (129163 bytes)

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QuartoBoxJul05-03.jpg (127928 bytes)  QuartoBoxJul05-04.jpg (229322 bytes) ThomasJul05-13.jpg (145051 bytes)

Rich Thomas showed club members another Quarto game cube set of teak, the top of which is walnut and hickory.      

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Irv Doty takes a breather in his Windsor chair that he made in the style of and in the traditional way, by hand. Irv used three different woods; northern pine for the seat, green red oak for upper pieces and hard maple for the spindles. It is finished with milk paint and topped with linseed oil.  The traditional color is green but he chose blue.

WindsorChairJul05-07.jpg (215933 bytes)   DotyJul05-15.jpg (124870 bytes)

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   LampJul05-01.jpg (128466 bytes)   KelleyJul05-16.jpg (136736 bytes)    

This lamp, as explained by Lon Kelley, is made of glued up plywood then turned.  Lon says that plywood doesn't turn very well.  Lon stained it dark followed by tung oil and wax.

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This intarsia balloon of purple heart, osage, padouk, walnut, western red cedar and oak is proudly showed off by Steve Wavro.  When Steve sanded the purple heart it turned brown.  He then placed the wood in the sunlight for two hours which returned the color to purple -neat trick...eh??

   IntarsiaBalloonJul05-02.jpg (181320 bytes) WavroJul05-17.jpg (119744 bytes)

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  SerigJul05-20.jpg (154370 bytes)

SerigJul05-21.jpg (124092 bytes)

       
Dennis Serig spoke to club members about the fine art of judging at woodworking exhibits that are held  mostly at county fairs.  Many fairs are very lenient with ribbons and awards as they want to encourage participation.  Dennis offered tips and suggestions if you are considering entering your work at a fair.

Try to find an "empty" class -- less competition

Concentrate on one project and do it well, don't try to enter many projects across the board.

Don't skimp on the details. Remove stray pencil marks and if a piece requires finishing on both sides -- do it.  

Attend the fair the year before and talk to judges and learn what they look for.

Obtain a copy of the rules and, obviously, follow them.

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