May 2004 Projects

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Sally White is an occupational  therapist with the Ben Taub hospital and talked to club members about wood working as a form of therapy. Sally displayed examples of the craft work that adult mental patients have done.  The May newsletter features an article about woodworking as therapy.  

  TherapyCraftMay04-22.jpg (103027 bytes) WhiteMay04-26.jpg (56237 bytes)TherapyCraftMay04-23.jpg (88028 bytes)

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PinRouterApr04-CM1.jpg (96601 bytes) PinRouterApr04-CM2.jpg (112059 bytes) PinRoutMay04.JPG (57576 bytes) MaxwellMay04-8.jpg (81559 bytes)

Chuck Maxwell showed club members a stool that he constructed to use with his pin router setup.  Chuck has invited club members to come by his shop and take a look at it.

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Joseph Rice proudly talked about his colorful phish...uh.. fish that he crafted of MDF.  He admits it is wall decor but some members think he'll try to catch a marlin with it.

FishMay04-15.jpg (100876 bytes) RiceMay04-28.jpg (61510 bytes) 

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  MatthewMay04-29.jpg (107008 bytes)  

Carl Matthew's son showed club members his bandsawed apple basket that he made as a mother's day gift.

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Fred Sandoval explains how he uses the jigs shown in the photograph.  Fred also showed pieces of a violin that is currently in progress.

JigMay04-20.jpg (65130 bytes) JigMay04-21.jpg (86844 bytes)  SandovalMay04-31.jpg (60175 bytes)ViolinPiecesMay04-24.jpg (97244 bytes)

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BirdsHeadJointsMay04-10.jpg (90165 bytes) KooserMay04-34.jpg (55138 bytes)BirdsHeadJointsMay04-9.jpg (48784 bytes) 

Ken Kooser explained how a bird's head bit on a router table makes a nice joint for pieces such as this octagonal cylinder. 

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Walter Mason built this small chest of drawers as a holder for various small items that need a home. Half inch plywood, scrap wood and cheap knobs turns into a nice set of drawers.

ChestofDwrsMay04-11.jpg (45264 bytes) MasonMay04-35.jpg (54744 bytes)ChestofDwrsMay04-12.jpg (82205 bytes)

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PlanterMay04-17.jpg (90693 bytes) RiceMay04-37.jpg (45668 bytes)PlanterMay04-18.jpg (120159 bytes)

Joseph Rice used  raised panel construction to put together this planter.

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 Austin Rice, son of Joseph Rice, explained to club members how he made this apple basket for his mother on Mom's Day.  

AppleBaskMay04-13.jpg (92826 bytes) RiceAustinMay04-38.jpg (71017 bytes) AppleBaskMay04-14.jpg (63113 bytes)

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LampMay04-56.jpg (72573 bytes)  LampMay04-57.jpg (72661 bytes)

Eddy  Arnold "enlightened" club members by displaying his oak lamp for club members to see.

                    ArnoldMay04-40.jpg (60107 bytes)

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Ridg Gilmer showed off the results of his miter saw project.  The shape is a tetrahedron or some exotic geometric description.  He said it was a trial and error effort to get the angles to come together just right.  The jigs are to help hold the pieces together for gluing.

TrayJigMay04-59.jpg (144018 bytes) GilmerMay04-41.jpg (43187 bytes) TrayMay04-58.jpg (161935 bytes) 

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 EndTableMay04-2.jpg (102587 bytes) EndTableMay04-3.jpg (158900 bytes) EndTableMay04-4.jpg (113691 bytes) HutchisonMay04-45.jpg (83816 bytes)

Jack Hutchison talks about his 18th century red gum Hepplewhite reproduction end table.  Jack explained the techniques he used to get the curved shape in the drawers.  A neat trick was to save the bandsawed cut used for cutting the drawer shape and use it as a mold for sanding the d fronts.  The fluted legs are routed on a table.  Jack said that he started the flute near the end rather than at the end to avoid burn marks.

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This quilt rack of cherry by Steve Wavro was finished with two coats of Minwax gel stain followed by polyeurethane.  The design on the side is hand carved.

QuiltRackMay04-5.jpg (117543 bytes) WavroMay04-48.jpg (124560 bytes) QuiltRackMay04-6.jpg (69848 bytes)

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BedBoardMay04-19.jpg (92138 bytes) KelleyMay04-50.jpg (117056 bytes)

Lon Kelley pointed out the feature of his solid maple bed frame.  He used lots of dowels that were drilled before bandsawing the curves of the slats.

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Frank Dorr showed club members his rail and stile door frame.

DoorFrameMay04-25.jpg (93394 bytes) DoorMay04-51.jpg (57334 bytes)

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TigerHeadMay04-65.jpg (118702 bytes) MurasMay04-53.jpg (77295 bytes)  

This tiger head crafted by Denis Muras will grace somebody's wall. Grrrrreaattt!

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Denis Muras demonstrated how several dozen router bits would fit into his router bit box made of box joint mahogany using his Incra jig.

ChestMay04-60.jpg (120707 bytes) ChestMay04-61.jpg (148900 bytes)  MurasMay04-55.jpg (91411 bytes)

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 HutchisonMay04-67.jpg (112302 bytes)  Click here to read Jack's outline for his presentation

Jack Hutchison gave a talk on woodworking finishes.  Here are a few notes:

Wipe with paint thinner to search for glue spots before staining.

Thin filler to mayo like paste and smear on.

Make sure flat surfaces are level and flat.

Start with 80 grit; 90% of work should be 80 grit.  Then go to 120 grit followed by 180 grit.

To inspect for scratches use paint thinner then lightly sand before staining.

Don't use wood putty (also known as colored caulking) for fine woodworking.

Don't use tack rag to remove dust because it leaves a chemical residue.  Use a rag with paint thinner.

Dyes penetrate while pigmented stains stays on surface.

Thin shellac with 50% alcohol.

When using dyes wear gloves or you stain your hands - it won't come off.

Water based dye penetrates deeper; wood loves water.

To enhance wood grain, use penetrating oils; tung oil, linseed oil for example.

For shellac use china bristle brushes and synthetic for oils.

Top off finish with paste wax.

 

 

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